What is not love is always fear, and nothing else.
All healing is essentially the release from fear.

Ho’oponopono

Posted: August 24th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Abuse, Forgiveness, Happiness, Healing, Ho'oponopono, Mind, Neglect, Psychology, PTSD, Stress, Tools, Video | No Comments »
It's fun to share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

An exquisitely simple yet powerfully effective ancient Hawaiian healing method…

More than thirty years ago, at the Hawaii State Hospital, there was a special ward, a clinic for mentally ill criminals. It was a violent, dangerous, dreary place. Most people had given up on these criminals.  The staff avoided them as much as possible.

Then a new psychologist – Dr. Hew Len – was assigned to the hospital. Dr. Len sat in his office and it is said that he never actually met with the inmates.  Instead, he sat with their files and used an ancient H awaiian healing practice called ho’oponopono.

The entire atmosphere, as well as the prisoners and the workers began to transform until after four years, so many prisoners were released that the clinic for the criminally insane was forced to close.

  • In the Hawaiian language, ho means to and makes a verb of the word pono.
  • Ponopono is defined in the Hawaiian Dictionary as mental cleansing, to make right; to put in order, to shape, correct, revise, adjust, amend, regulate, arrange, rectify, tidy up, to make orderly or neat.
  • Pono means goodness, uprightness, morality, moral qualities, correct or proper procedure, excellence, well-being, prosperity, welfare, benefit, true condition or nature, duty; moral, fitting, proper, righteous, right, upright, just, virtuous, fair, beneficial, successful, in perfect order, accurate, correct, eased, relieved; should, ought, must, necessary.

Native Hawaiians believed that illness was caused by the stress of anger, guilt, recriminations and lack of forgiveness. The ho’oponopono process begins with a statement of the problem, so first find a few words that define the problem, then sit quietly in peace and sincerely address the person or people involved in any way with the words,

I’m sorry.
Please forgive me.
I love you.
Thank you.

I have used other words too.  My list includes,

I love you.
I care about  you.
I respect you.
I forgive you.
I release you.
I pray that something wonderful happens to you.

Repeat often until you can breathe fully and freely and deeply.  Then move on to the next person on your list. Be sure to include yourself.

 

It's fun to share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone


Leave a Reply